La

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Lishepus

Etymology

From Proto-Afro-Asiatic *la.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈla/

Particle

la

  1. no
  2. (clausal negation) not

Munja'kin

Etymology

From Proto-Munja'kin *lae.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈla/

Particle

la

  1. co-occurs with a new subject or a subject which differs from the previous subject (for identical subjects, see lanú)

Creation and Usage Notes

One of the things I've been doing more of late is trying to correct past mistakes. Since Munja'kin was effectively Kamakawi 2, I decided to use subject markers again, but to come up with a plausible historical explanation for them. In this case, la comes from a word used in a similar way to "and then", but reduced and grammaticalized. Its companion, lanú, is a combination of that same word and older *nau, which is roughly "same". The idea is it would be used as a pronoun, coming from a phrase like "Then the same did x". They didn't enjoy a lot of use in the dialogue, since most of the dialogue was single sentences by one character, but I thought it was a decent attempt to get it right.

-David J. Peterson 15:41, 2 June 2020 (PDT)

Yulish

Etymology

The etymology of this word comes from an invisible proto-language. If you're confident you know the etymology, feel free to add it, but reader beware should the etymology be added by someone other than the creator of the language!

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈla/

Pronoun

la (plain second person singular, plural fa)

  1. you; second person singular personal pronoun, plain form
Inflection

Creation and Usage Notes

See my note on fa.

-David J. Peterson 17:38, 27 April 2020 (PDT)